PLEDGE NOW
Here and Now with Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson
Public radio's live
midday news program
With sponsorship from
Mathworks - Accelerating the pace of engineering and science
Accelerating the pace
of engineering and science
Monday, April 29, 2013

Putting A Price On Life And Limb

Kenneth Feinberg, an attorney who managed the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund, speaks at a news conference in Boston on April 23, 2013, as Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick listens at right. Feinberg will design and be administrator of a new fund to help people affected by the Boston Marathon bombing. (Elise Amendola/AP)

Kenneth Feinberg, an attorney who managed the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund, speaks at a news conference in Boston on April 23, 2013, as Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick listens at right. Feinberg will design and be administrator of a new fund to help people affected by the Boston Marathon bombing. (Elise Amendola/AP)

In the two weeks since the Boston Marathon bombings, the charity set up for the victims has raised more than $27 million.

Ken Feinberg, a Massachusetts native who handled victims’ compensation after 9/11, the BP oil spill, the Virginia Tech mass shooting and the Aurora movie theater mass shooting, among other calamities, is now in charge of The One Fund Boston.

“Every time I’m asked to do one of these, I say to myself, ‘God willing, it is the last one that I will do.'”

– Ken Feinberg

“Every time I’m asked to do one of these, I say to myself, ‘God willing, it is the last one that I will do.’ I don’t welcome this obligation, I don’t look forward to it. But life has a way of throwing curve balls at people, and this is the result sometimes,” Feinberg told Here & Now’s Robin Young.

Next week, Feinberg will hold the first of two town hall meetings for victims’ families. The bombings killed three people and hurt more than 260, including more than a dozen amputations.

The meetings will help determine how the One Fund money will be distributed, though Feinberg already has a rough idea of how that should be done.

“I would say that most of the funds that have been raised should go to the families of the dead – the four who died,” he said, including in his count the MIT police officer allegedly slain by the bombing suspects. “And a similar amount should probably go to those horribly maimed and physically injured by the bombings – double amputees, paralysis, brain injuries.”

Guest:


Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

June 6 Comment

Introducing A New Here & Now Website

Coming June 9, 2016, Here & Now listeners and visitors will experience our stories and journalism online in a whole new way.

June 3 Comment

Teenagers Create Impromptu Exhibit At San Francisco Museum Of Modern Art

As the pair toured the museum, they wondered if they could do better. So 16-year-old Kevin Nguyen decided to get creative.

June 3 3 Comments

‘Silver Linings Playbook’ Author Explores Conformity, Mental Health In New Teen Novel

Matthew Quick published his fourth young adult book, "Every Exquisite Thing," this week.

June 2 13 Comments

Do Meal Kits Provide Great Taste Along With Convenience?

Resident chef Kathy Gunst tested a multitude of meal kits, and gives co-host Jeremy Hobson the inside scoop.